Abortion Story // Having a Baby After an Abortion

Motherhood after abortion

November 27, 2007

22 years old, junior in college, in a fresh new relationship with a tall, lumberjack-looking, bike-riding, coffee-slinging, bearded dreamboat

That was the day we walked into Planned Parenthood together to end my 7-week pregnancy.

We’d visited the week before for the official pregnancy test and counseling. Everyone working there was soft-spoken, gentle, and kind. They asked me countless times if I felt safe at home, if I felt pressured to make this choice, and if I understood my other options. For such a hollow, sad time, I felt very supported by the staff and by my partner.

If I chose to carry my child to term and gave it up for adoption, the eventual passing of my then-boyfriend-turned-fiance to brain cancer would’ve been even more devastating than it already was. Losing a partner at a young age was already a shattering experience, but having his child roam the earth without me because we weren’t ready is unimaginable.

As I looked around the waiting room, most of the women sitting near me had children with them. It made me wonder what this experience would be like if I wasn’t a college-educated, middle class woman with her own apartment, her own vehicle, and a supportive boyfriend and parents.

What if I couldn’t afford the procedure? What if the pregnancy had been the result of a sexual assault? What if my partner forced me to carry the child? What if I wanted to keep the child and my partner left me? What if I didn’t have family to take me in and support me after I chose to have the child?

November 17, 2015

30 years old, small business owner, self-proclaimed boss babe, happily married

That was the day I found out I was going to be a mom again.

This time around, I was mentally, physically, and fiscally ready to have a child. Every ultrasound brought me tears of joy. The first flutter, the first kick, the first hiccups: they all filled me with a warmth that I cannot describe.

I’ve always been pro-choice. Abortions happen. For me, it was a devastating, hollow, soul-wrenching decision, and it will stay with me for the rest of my life. But being able to DECIDE when I was ready to bring my child into the world made my pregnancy even more special. In 2007 my birth control failed, but I was lucky enough to have health insurance and an affordable, local option for care. It terrifies me that this already challenging experience could be made even more difficult by lack of access.

With the counsel of the Planned Parenthood staff, I could’ve carried my pregnancy to term and given up my child for adoption. That may be a beautiful option for some, and I’m glad they gave me plenty of information about it paired with time to ponder.

If I chose to carry my child to term and gave it up for adoption, the eventual passing of my then-boyfriend-turned-fiance to brain cancer would’ve been even more devastating than it already was. Losing a partner at a young age was already a shattering experience, but having his child roam the earth without me because we weren’t ready is unimaginable.

If I chose to carry my child to term and raise it, I would’ve had to drop out of college, move back in with my parents, and put all of my entrepreneurial endeavors on hold indefinitely.

All in all, choosing to end a pregnancy at a young age shaped me into the mother I am today. I’m more grateful for the challenges I faced that better-prepared me to be a complete and present mom to my son.

I hope no woman ever has to make the choice that I made. But if they do, I hope there are accessible and affordable facilities that help them make the right choice for them.

Never hesitate to share your story. Abortion is awful. But it’s a reality that we must address and protect.


Christine Haines Greenberg is the CEO of Urban Set Bride + Wood Grain & Lace Events. She could live off of wine, cheese, salami, and crackers. She worships in the House of Beyonce and loves Target, politics, trashy television, thrift store shopping, and spending time with her friends and family.