Why We Need More Disability Representation in Weddings

Why We Need More Disability Representation in Weddings

Owners and sisters, Laura Allen and Sarah Parker, of The White Collection change the window display monthly but they had no idea what a statement they were making when they decided to display a mannequin sitting in a wheelchair. In an industry that tends to exclude those that are different, this new example of inclusion is hopefully the beginning of a bigger movement.

Read More

Why It's Ableist to Ban the Plastic Straw

Why It's Ableist to Ban the Plastic Straw

The debate about the plastic straw should have stopped the first time a person with a disability said, “Wait a minute… I need a plastic straw to drink.” Environmentalists should have apologized and moved on to the next issue, one that probably would have a greater impact on the plastic pollution crisis. However, months later, the disabled are still fighting to be heard on social media and at city council meetings across the globe.

Read More

Adapting to the Ordinary // A “Traditionally Untraditional” Wedding

Adapting to the Ordinary // A “Traditionally Untraditional” Wedding

Soon after the last phone call was made and the pictures of the engagement ring were uploaded to various social media platforms, it was time to switch gears and focus on turning our wedding day visions into a reality. Then it was time to discuss the wedding plans. Where would we get married?  How many guests could we invite? How were we going to afford this? So many questions, and nearly as much advice, came flooding in.

Read More

Adapting to the Ordinary // The Dreaded “I” Word

Adapting to the Ordinary // The Dreaded “I” Word

Accomplishing everyday tasks or doing ordinary things that able-bodied people do (like buying milk, going to school or getting married) are not inspiring. And to categorize them as such lowers the expectations we have for people with disabilities. This is problematic in a lot of aspects but particularly when fighting for equal opportunities in education and employment.

Read More

Adapting to the Ordinary // For Better or Worse: The Reality of America’s Safety Net Programs for Married Couples with Disabilities

Adapting to the Ordinary // For Better or Worse: The Reality of America’s Safety Net Programs for Married Couples with Disabilities

The marriage penalty also affects non-disabled couples too. If you or a spouse become disabled while married, a couple must spend-down their assets in order to have the government provide basic needs indefinitely. Financial situations can be so dire, couples pursue divorce just to qualify, allowing the abled-bodied spouse to keep some of their assets. Divorce is a reality that no one should have to face because they got injured or sick.

Read More

Adapting to the Ordinary // DOs and DON’Ts of a Disability “Woke” Business

Adapting to the Ordinary // DOs and DON’Ts of a Disability “Woke” Business

When working with clients with disabilities, there are many considerations for making a great first impression and a long-lasting relationship. While you probably already work with other minorities, people with disabilities may require special accommodations you may not be aware of. Each individual has different abilities and needs that may require some creativity on your part to be inclusive and accommodating. No matter the type of vendor you are, here are some DOs and DON’Ts you should consider to be a disability-“woke” business:

Read More

Adapting to the Ordinary // 7 Tips for Wedding Dress Shopping in a Wheelchair

Adapting to the Ordinary // 7 Tips for Wedding Dress Shopping in a Wheelchair

"I searched bridal magazines and the internet for inspiration, but only found a few brides in wheelchairs. And I didn't really related to any of them. Would I feel beautiful like my friends did when they found their dresses? Could I wear a dress and sit comfortably all day, or would I need to wear a pantsuit or a two-piece ensemble? I was willing to embrace these new bridal trends, but I secretly wanted a dress. So much of my world as a disabled woman is already unconventional. My fiancé had never even seen me in a dress, so it was important for me to wear a wedding dress.

Read More